Inspiration: The A-ha Moments [INFOGRAPHIC]

the-aha-moments-of-entrepreneurs-infographic

8 Ways to Measure Your Success

Success is hard. We all want it; we’re not always sure when we get there. It doesn’t always feel like you’re achieving the success you have your eyes on, but are you measuring your success correctly?

Here are our top 8 ways to measure your success:

1. You’re willing to ask for help.

Being successful doesn’t mean doing everything by yourself. A measure of your success could be your willingness to work on a team. Finding the strength the ask for help is a sign your headed in the right direction.

2. The art of letting go.

The unsuccessful can cling to things that aren’t good for them and don’t make them happy. As a successful person, you’re able to let it go to seek your greater happiness.

3. You aren’t afraid of failure

Failure is only the opposite of success if you let it win. Successful people know that failure is just part of the process of growing.

4. You’re happy for others success

People who haven’t achieved personal success are jealous of the people who have. If you can be happy for people who have found their success, it’s a good sign for you. Also, it’s healthy.

5. You look forward to the future

The successful have things they look forward to. Is there something coming up in your future that you’re excited for? What do you anticipate? If you don’t look forward to anything, maybe try finding a meetup or conference that can kickstart your excitement.

6. You can measure your goals

Just because you haven’t reached your ultimate goal doesn’t mean you haven’t achieved some. I you’re feeling like you haven’t accomplished anything, take a look back over the past few years and see what you have done. You might find a list of goals that you knocked out of the park.

7. You aren’t the victim

People with a victim mentality have a problem being successful. If you spend your life thinking “why me?” then you never get around to saying “why not me?”

8. You focus on the things you can change.

There are a lot of things you can’t change. Successful people focus on the things they can change. If you spend too much time focusing on what you can’t change, you’re not changing things for the better.

How do you measure your success? What are some things you look at to mark your progress? Share in the comments.

Required Reading for Entrepreneurs: Enchantment by Guy Kawasaki

The author of the international bestseller The Art of the Start offers a new perspective on the art of influence.

enchantmentGuy Kawasaki’s acclaimed books have established him as the entrepreneur’s entrepreneur, and in The Art of the Start he wrote the essential contemporary guide for starting any new enterprise. Now Kawasaki turns to the mystery of influence and offers a compelling new take on this key force that drives any successful business or personal interaction.

Enchantment‘s fundamental message is that in any transaction the goal is not to get your own way, but to bring about a voluntary, enduring, and delightful change of heart in other people, by working with and through them and enlisting their own goals and desires. It’s enchantment that enables us to maneuver through difficult decisions, break people’s entrenched habits, defy the wisdom of crowds, and get colleagues to work for long-term goals.

Kawasaki’s advice includes:
• How to Achieve Rapport, Credibility, and Trust
• How to Help People Enchant Themselves
• How to Overcome Resistance
• How to Enchant Your Employees…and Your Boss
• How to Resist Enchantment

Anchored by his road-tested wisdom and inimitable wit, Enchantment is another classic from one of the most respected voices in business today.

Interview: Amanda Pekoe, co-founder and CEO of The Pekoe Group

pekoeAmanda Pekoe is the co-founder and CEO of The Pekoe Group. The Pekoe Group is a full-service boutique marketing and advertising agency offering their creative ingenuity to you.

Listen to Amanda’s interview here. Read the rest of this entry

Inspiration: Cameron Herold: Let’s raise kids to be entrepreneurs [Video]

Bored in school, failing classes, at odds with peers: This child might be an entrepreneur, says Cameron Herold. In his talk, he makes the case for parenting and education that helps would-be entrepreneurs flourish — as kids and as adults.

Required Reading for Entrepreneurs: The Wisdom of Failure by Laurence G. Weinzimmer and Jim McConoughey

wisdomThe “how-not-to” leadership book
There is a paradox in leadership: we can only succeed by knowing failure. Every accomplished leader knows there are minefields of failures that need to be navigated in order to succeed. Wouldn’t it be great to have the insights to help you prevent from making avoidable mistakes? Unfortunately, in business talking about mistakes can be taboo, and, at a certain level, learning from failure is not an option. Weinzimmer and McConoughey speak frankly about the things that are difficult to talk about – the unvarnished truths necessary to become a successful leader.

  • Based on a groundbreaking 7-year study of what almost 1000 managers across 21 industries really think about lessons from failures
  • Includes exclusive interview material from CEOs at a wide range of organizations, including major firms such as Caterpillar, Priceline.com, and Allstate; startups; and entrepreneurial small businesses
  • Drills down into failure to uncover the strategies that aspiring leaders need in order to avoid the most damning leadership mistakes: unbalanced orchestration, drama management, and reckless vanity

Learning from the mistakes of others is a necessary part of the journey of effective leadership, and this book offers an indispensable guide to learning these powerful lessons—without paying the price of failure.

Interview: Nikhil Arora, co-founder of Back to the Roots

Nikhil Arora is co-founder of Back to the Roots.nikhil

Listen to Nikhil’s interview here. Read the rest of this entry

Inspiration: The Startup Founder Cheat Sheet [INFOGRAPHIC]

startupfounder

Failure is Always an Option: 3 Retailers that Disappeared

You think you’ve made it. Your business is on top and been up there for awhile. You’ve diversified, you have franchises. But, here are 3 retailers who found out that failure is always an option, and what you can learn from it.

1. Blockbuster

Always Blockbuster. Poor, poor Blockbuster. In 2002, Blockbuster was valued at $5 billion. It had even become synonymous with renting a movie. If you wanted to rent a movie for the weekend, you asked if anyone wanted to go to Blockbuster, even if you were going to Hollywood Video. Blockbuster filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in September 2010.

What went wrong:

Netflix and Redbox came and pushed them out of the market.

What can you learn:

Always be ready to embrace new technologies, especially if your company’s product is technology. Evolve or perish.

2. K. B. Toys

When it filed for bankruptcy in 2008, K.B. Toys was the leading mail-based toy retailer, but even then it only represented a small percentage of the United States toy market.

What went wrong:

Wal-Mart, Target, and Amazon had better prices.

What can you learn:

Downsizing is not a four-letter word. If you’re good at something, don’t be afraid to try and be the best at it. If K.B. Toys had focused on it’s mail order sales while decreasing it’s brick-and-mortar presence, would it still be around? If it had embraced Amazon’s Marketplace, or eBay would it have sold more through the mail? Maybe not. But, it’s something to think about.

3. Woolworths

In 1997, after 117 years, the last Woolworths closed its doors. It wasn’t all failure, though. The Woolworth Corporation changed its name to Venator Group and still operates some retail stores, including Foot Locker and Northern Reflections.

What went wrong:

Again, lower prices at Wal-Mart and Target helped to bury Woolworths. However, America moving out of the cities and into the suburbs was the first shovelful of dirt in the grave. As America left the city, tastes changed. And one of those tastes was a distinct lack of interest in what Woolworths had to offer.

What you can learn:

Sometimes, the market disappears.

Do you know of a company that failed? What can be learned from their failure? Share in the comments below.

Required Reading for Entrepreneurs: Youtility: Why Smart Marketing is About Help Not Hype by Jay Baer {Comment to Win!}

youtilityThe difference between helping and selling is just two letters

If you’re wondering how to make your products seem more exciting online, you’re asking the wrong question. You’re not competing for attention only against other similar products. You’re competing against your customers’ friends and family and viral videos and cute puppies. To win attention these days you must ask a different question: “How can we help?”

Jay Baer’s Youtility offers a new approach that cuts through the clut­ter: marketing that is truly, inherently useful. If you sell something, you make a customer today, but if you genuinely help someone, you create a customer for life.

Drawing from real examples of companies who are practicing Youtility as well as his experience helping more than seven hundred brands improve their marketing strategy, Baer provides a groundbreaking plan for using information and helpfulness to transform the relationship between companies and customers.

Tell us why you want to upgrade your marketing. Comment to win a copy of Jay Baer’s Youtility.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,051 other followers

%d bloggers like this: