Interview: Matthew Edgar, Founder and Developer for SpringTrax

springMatthew Edgar is the founder and developer for SpringTrax. SpringTrax can help hunt down and wipe out all your broken links and 404 errors.

Listen to Matthew’s interview here. Read the rest of this entry

Inspiration: 16 Surprising Statistics About Small Business [INFOGRAPHIC]

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5 Reasons to Start Your Own Business

At BizTV, it’s no secret, we’re all about entrepreneurs, small business owners, and making your own way through the financial world.

Not included on this list: wearing pajamas to work

Today, we’re going to give you an excuse to join the ranks of the self-employed (as if you need one), and, hey, if you’re already there, maybe you have some of your own excuses to share in the comments.

1. Tax benefits

Bet you didn’t think that would be number 1, did you? But, it’s true. There are many tax benefits that the entrepreneur and small business owner can call their own. If you educate yourself on tax law, or hire a good accountant, there are expenses for your business that you can write off. If you employ your family, you can keep the money within the household. If you hire your children, you are relieved from withholding income taxes and paying payroll taxes, including Social Security, until the child turns 18. Also, you don’t pay federal unemployment until the child reaches 21. If you hire your spouse or parents, you don’t need to pay federal unemployment taxes on them either, though you must withhold federal income tax and pay FICA on them. Corporations are not allowed these tax breaks. Enjoy!

2. As long as you get your own work, you’re in charge of your own job security

This might be a double-edged sword if you aren’t good at selling yourself (read: get good at selling yourself). If you have a skill or product that’s in high demand, you’re on top. No one is going to downsize your department. You’re in charge of your own employment future.

3. You can challenge yourself

Think about your job right now. Are you challenged? Are you stimulated? Do you jump into work every day with a take charge attitude because you’re excited to solve the next puzzle that falls in your lap? If you answered “no” to any of these questions, take heed: every day with your own business is as challenging as you want it to be. Are you going to integrate a new technology? Are you going to find a way to appeal to a new customer base? You have the ability to explore and challenge yourself every day.

4. You are the expert

Think about how satisfying it would be to tell someone: “Trust me. I’m an expert.”

Well, when you own a business that provides a certain product or service, you have the right to say you’re an expert in that product or service. You know what you’re talking about. You’ve learned things to trial and error. You create your own expertise.

5. You’re in control of your own networking

What’s your passion? Have you ever wanted to find people who share that passion? As the owner of your own business, you have the right to pursue the opportunities with those people who share your interests. In fact, it’s encouraged. Go to conferences. Go to meetups. You’ll find the people worth knowing in your industry.

Those are some of our reasons to get out of the rat race and join the self-employment movement. What made you leap from regular employment to entrepreneurship? Share in the comments!

Required Reading for Entrepreneurs: The Start-up of You by Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha

startupofyouA blueprint for thriving in your job and building a career by applying the lessons of Silicon Valley’s most innovative entrepreneurs.

The career escalator is jammed at every level. Unemployment rates are sky-high. Creative disruption is shaking every industry. Global competition for jobs is fierce. The employer-employee pact is over and traditional job security is a thing of the past.

Here, LinkedIn cofounder and chairman Reid Hoffman and author Ben Casnocha show how to accelerate your career in today’s competitive world. The key is to manage your career as if it were a start-up business: a living, breathing, growing start-up of you.

Why? Start-ups – and the entrepreneurs who run them – are nimble. They invest in themselves. They build their professional networks. They take intelligent risks. They make uncertainty and volatility work to their advantage.

These are the very same skills professionals need to get ahead today.

This book isn’t about cover letters or resumes. Instead, you will learn the best practices of Silicon Valley start-ups, and how to apply these entrepreneurial strategies to your career. Whether you work for a giant multinational corporation, a small local business, or launching your own venture, you need to know how to:

* Adapt your career plans as you change, the people around you change, and industries change.
* Develop a competitive advantage to win the best jobs and opportunities.
* Strengthen your professional network by building powerful alliances and maintaining a diverse mix of relationships.
Find the unique breakout opportunities that massively accelerate career growth.
* Take proactive risks to become more resilient to industry tsunamis.
* Tap your network for information and intelligence that help you make smarter decisions.

A revolutionary new guide to thriving in today’s fractured world of work, the strategies in this book will help you survive and thrive and achieve your boldest professional ambitions. The Start-Up of You empowers you to become the CEO of your career and take control of your future.

How to Avoid Collaboration Fatigue

Originally posted on HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review:

It’s nearly impossible to escape a meeting or conference call without someone touting the virtues of collaboration. After all, researchers have linked collaboration to increased innovation, and many have compellingly argued for collaboration’s role in better leadership performance. Collaboration just feels right — like a big hug or a warm puppy.

But collaboration also has an overlooked dark side.

Picture this: A complex issue is identified. A diverse, cross-functional team is assembled to solve it. Key stakeholders are gathered. Information is collected. Options are debated. Approval is sought. And then… nothing happens. So more information is gathered. More stakeholders are invited. More conference calls are logged. More debate ensues. More approval is sought. Round and round the project goes — when, where, and how somebody will decide, nobody knows.

This is a recipe for collaboration fatigue, and if consumed in large doses for prolonged periods, this potent blend of abdication…

View original 473 more words

Interview: Amy Abatangle, VP of Sales and Marketing at Untangle

Amy Abatangle is the VP of Sales and Marketing at Untangle.

Listen to Amy’s interview here. Read the rest of this entry

The 12 Best Jobs in 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC]

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3 Way to Maintain Your Entrepreneurial Attitude

So, you’ve decided you’re an entrepreneur. That’s no small feat. I liken it to Superman wearing his underpants on the outside for the first time and feeling, no, KNOWING, this is my future. But, unlike Superman, you don’t have x-ray vision, you can’t leap tall buildings in a single bound, and you can’t reverse the flow of time by flying around the planet backward (I’m pretty sure that wouldn’t work, anyway.) Not having superhuman capabilities means you will experience moments of doubt during your enterpreneurial trials. How will you keep up your spirits and forge ahead? Here are some ways we like:

1. Don’t Panic

Ah, yes, the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’s motto is also our first little piece of advice. As unevolved life forms, we developed a fight-or-flight reflex that saved us from predators. That reflex has lasted with us to the present. Except, now it might kick in when we’re giving a presentation or preparing to meet an investor. If the walls are closing in on you and you start to feel the fear, take a few calming breaths and try to pull back from the brink. You aren’t the first person in the world to feel overwhelmed. It’s not like there’s some guy out there that’s so good at being human that’s he’s never been embarrassed, or awkward, or unprepared.

Panic is bad for you. It leads to bad decisions. Which leads to more panic. Don’t feed the beast. If you do slip over the edge into full blown panic mode, distance yourself from the workplace and avoid making any big decisions. Reschedule that meeting. Make good choices by not panicking.

2. Write Down Your Goals

If you’re a subscriber to this blog, you’ve probably read a post or two about goal-setting. It’s true. We’re big advocates of setting goals. Right now, though, I’m talking specifically about short term goals and actually the act of writing them down on a piece of paper. Stay connected to what you want in the short term and it will keep you motivated.

3. Go On Vacation

Sometimes, you just need a break. Being an entrepreneur is stressful and consuming. Sometimes it’s hard to tell when you’re body and mind are asking for a break. Go ahead and refresh yourself. It’s okay. I’m giving you permission to take some time off for yourself. You’ll come back replenished and be that much better for it.

How do you maintain your entrepreneurial attitude? What doesn’t work? Share in the comments!

Required Reading for Entrepreneurs: Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

thinkingIn the international bestseller, Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman, the renowned psychologist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. The impact of overconfidence on corporate strategies, the difficulties of predicting what will make us happy in the future, the profound effect of cognitive biases on everything from playing the stock market to planning our next vacation—each of these can be understood only by knowing how the two systems shape our judgments and decisions.

Engaging the reader in a lively conversation about how we think, Kahneman reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives—and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. Winner of the National Academy of Sciences Best Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and selected by The New York Times Book Review as one of the ten best books of 2011, Thinking, Fast and Slow is destined to be a classic.

Happy 4th!

Have a safe and happy 4th of July!

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