Category Archives: Inspiration

5 More Reasons to Start Your Own Business

Last week, we talked about our top 5 reasons to start your own business and guess what? We have 5 more.

You ready? Because here we go!

1. You will finally have the respect you deserve

Mainly, you’ll learn to respect yourself. I’m not going to sugarcoat it. Starting your own business is tough. More than tough. It might be the hardest thing you’ve ever done. When you get to the other side, success or failure, you’ll see exactly what you’re capable of when pursuing your passion and dreams. Everyone surrounding you on the endeavor will see it, too.

2. You’ll create jobs

In the last post, we talked about the tax breaks that come with hiring your family. That’s all well and good, but think about all the other jobs you’re creating. You’ll be an economy-stimulation machine. You’ll have the chance to mine and cultivate talent. You’ll be the one in the boss’s seat.

3. Your story will reach your customers

When we talk about branding on this site, one of the things we like to talk about is sharing your story. Why are you here? Why is this the thing you’re passionate about? When you share your passion with people, they can passionate in response. Your customers are the perfect people to hear your story and help you spread the word.

4. You can flex your creative muscle

One of the big things the self-employed tend to do is find their creative flow and use it to advance and grow their business. Imagine what kind of entrepreneur/boss/innovator you can be when you are allowed to work the way you’re comfortable with. Being your own boss let’s you off the leash to explore your full capabilities. Go as far as you can.

5. Start a legacy

Whether you want to keep the company in the family or hand it over to your most trusted second in command, you have started something that could last for a long time. Your business could be enduring. You could start something that lasts far into the future, beginning with your own innovation and spreading out for generations to come.

Why would you start your own business? Did you start your own business? What pushed or inspired you to jump from the corporate world into the world of self-employment? Share in the comments!

Required Reading for Entrepreneurs: Big Bang Disruption by Larry Downes

bigbangIt used to take years or even decades for disruptive innovations to dethrone dominant products and services. But now any business can be devastated virtually overnight by something better and cheaper. How can executives protect themselves and harness the power of Big Bang Disruption?

Just a few years ago, drivers happily spent more than $200 for a GPS unit. But as smartphones exploded in popularity, free navigation apps exceeded the performance of stand-alone devices. Eighteen months after the debut of the navigation apps, leading GPS manufacturers had lost 85 percent of their market value.

Consumer electronics and computer makers have long struggled in a world of exponential technology improvements and short product life spans. But until recently, hotels, taxi services, doctors, and energy companies had little to fear from the information revolution.

Those days are gone forever. Software-based products are replacing physical goods. And every service provider must compete with cloud-based tools that offer customers a better way to interact.

Today, start-ups with minimal experience and no capital can unravel your strategy before you even begin to grasp what’s happening. Never mind the “innovator’s dilemma”—this is the innovator’s disaster. And it’s happening in nearly every industry.

Worse, Big Bang Disruptors may not even see you as competition. They don’t share your approach to customer service, and they’re not sizing up your product line to offer better prices. You may simply be collateral damage in their efforts to win completely different markets.

The good news is that any business can master the strategy of the start-ups. Larry Downes and Paul Nunes analyze the origins, economics, and anatomy of Big Bang Disruption. They identify four key stages of the new innovation life cycle, helping you spot potential disruptors in time. And they offer twelve rules for defending your markets, launching disruptors of your own, and getting out while there’s still time.

Based on extensive research by the Accenture Institute for High Performance and in-depth interviews with entrepreneurs, investors, and executives from more than thirty industries, Big Bang Disruption will arm you with strategies and insights to thrive in this brave new world.

Inspiration: 16 Surprising Statistics About Small Business [INFOGRAPHIC]

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5 Reasons to Start Your Own Business

At BizTV, it’s no secret, we’re all about entrepreneurs, small business owners, and making your own way through the financial world.

Not included on this list: wearing pajamas to work

Today, we’re going to give you an excuse to join the ranks of the self-employed (as if you need one), and, hey, if you’re already there, maybe you have some of your own excuses to share in the comments.

1. Tax benefits

Bet you didn’t think that would be number 1, did you? But, it’s true. There are many tax benefits that the entrepreneur and small business owner can call their own. If you educate yourself on tax law, or hire a good accountant, there are expenses for your business that you can write off. If you employ your family, you can keep the money within the household. If you hire your children, you are relieved from withholding income taxes and paying payroll taxes, including Social Security, until the child turns 18. Also, you don’t pay federal unemployment until the child reaches 21. If you hire your spouse or parents, you don’t need to pay federal unemployment taxes on them either, though you must withhold federal income tax and pay FICA on them. Corporations are not allowed these tax breaks. Enjoy!

2. As long as you get your own work, you’re in charge of your own job security

This might be a double-edged sword if you aren’t good at selling yourself (read: get good at selling yourself). If you have a skill or product that’s in high demand, you’re on top. No one is going to downsize your department. You’re in charge of your own employment future.

3. You can challenge yourself

Think about your job right now. Are you challenged? Are you stimulated? Do you jump into work every day with a take charge attitude because you’re excited to solve the next puzzle that falls in your lap? If you answered “no” to any of these questions, take heed: every day with your own business is as challenging as you want it to be. Are you going to integrate a new technology? Are you going to find a way to appeal to a new customer base? You have the ability to explore and challenge yourself every day.

4. You are the expert

Think about how satisfying it would be to tell someone: “Trust me. I’m an expert.”

Well, when you own a business that provides a certain product or service, you have the right to say you’re an expert in that product or service. You know what you’re talking about. You’ve learned things to trial and error. You create your own expertise.

5. You’re in control of your own networking

What’s your passion? Have you ever wanted to find people who share that passion? As the owner of your own business, you have the right to pursue the opportunities with those people who share your interests. In fact, it’s encouraged. Go to conferences. Go to meetups. You’ll find the people worth knowing in your industry.

Those are some of our reasons to get out of the rat race and join the self-employment movement. What made you leap from regular employment to entrepreneurship? Share in the comments!

Required Reading for Entrepreneurs: The Start-up of You by Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha

startupofyouA blueprint for thriving in your job and building a career by applying the lessons of Silicon Valley’s most innovative entrepreneurs.

The career escalator is jammed at every level. Unemployment rates are sky-high. Creative disruption is shaking every industry. Global competition for jobs is fierce. The employer-employee pact is over and traditional job security is a thing of the past.

Here, LinkedIn cofounder and chairman Reid Hoffman and author Ben Casnocha show how to accelerate your career in today’s competitive world. The key is to manage your career as if it were a start-up business: a living, breathing, growing start-up of you.

Why? Start-ups – and the entrepreneurs who run them – are nimble. They invest in themselves. They build their professional networks. They take intelligent risks. They make uncertainty and volatility work to their advantage.

These are the very same skills professionals need to get ahead today.

This book isn’t about cover letters or resumes. Instead, you will learn the best practices of Silicon Valley start-ups, and how to apply these entrepreneurial strategies to your career. Whether you work for a giant multinational corporation, a small local business, or launching your own venture, you need to know how to:

* Adapt your career plans as you change, the people around you change, and industries change.
* Develop a competitive advantage to win the best jobs and opportunities.
* Strengthen your professional network by building powerful alliances and maintaining a diverse mix of relationships.
Find the unique breakout opportunities that massively accelerate career growth.
* Take proactive risks to become more resilient to industry tsunamis.
* Tap your network for information and intelligence that help you make smarter decisions.

A revolutionary new guide to thriving in today’s fractured world of work, the strategies in this book will help you survive and thrive and achieve your boldest professional ambitions. The Start-Up of You empowers you to become the CEO of your career and take control of your future.

The 12 Best Jobs in 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC]

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3 Way to Maintain Your Entrepreneurial Attitude

So, you’ve decided you’re an entrepreneur. That’s no small feat. I liken it to Superman wearing his underpants on the outside for the first time and feeling, no, KNOWING, this is my future. But, unlike Superman, you don’t have x-ray vision, you can’t leap tall buildings in a single bound, and you can’t reverse the flow of time by flying around the planet backward (I’m pretty sure that wouldn’t work, anyway.) Not having superhuman capabilities means you will experience moments of doubt during your enterpreneurial trials. How will you keep up your spirits and forge ahead? Here are some ways we like:

1. Don’t Panic

Ah, yes, the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’s motto is also our first little piece of advice. As unevolved life forms, we developed a fight-or-flight reflex that saved us from predators. That reflex has lasted with us to the present. Except, now it might kick in when we’re giving a presentation or preparing to meet an investor. If the walls are closing in on you and you start to feel the fear, take a few calming breaths and try to pull back from the brink. You aren’t the first person in the world to feel overwhelmed. It’s not like there’s some guy out there that’s so good at being human that’s he’s never been embarrassed, or awkward, or unprepared.

Panic is bad for you. It leads to bad decisions. Which leads to more panic. Don’t feed the beast. If you do slip over the edge into full blown panic mode, distance yourself from the workplace and avoid making any big decisions. Reschedule that meeting. Make good choices by not panicking.

2. Write Down Your Goals

If you’re a subscriber to this blog, you’ve probably read a post or two about goal-setting. It’s true. We’re big advocates of setting goals. Right now, though, I’m talking specifically about short term goals and actually the act of writing them down on a piece of paper. Stay connected to what you want in the short term and it will keep you motivated.

3. Go On Vacation

Sometimes, you just need a break. Being an entrepreneur is stressful and consuming. Sometimes it’s hard to tell when you’re body and mind are asking for a break. Go ahead and refresh yourself. It’s okay. I’m giving you permission to take some time off for yourself. You’ll come back replenished and be that much better for it.

How do you maintain your entrepreneurial attitude? What doesn’t work? Share in the comments!

Required Reading for Entrepreneurs: Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

thinkingIn the international bestseller, Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman, the renowned psychologist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. The impact of overconfidence on corporate strategies, the difficulties of predicting what will make us happy in the future, the profound effect of cognitive biases on everything from playing the stock market to planning our next vacation—each of these can be understood only by knowing how the two systems shape our judgments and decisions.

Engaging the reader in a lively conversation about how we think, Kahneman reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives—and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. Winner of the National Academy of Sciences Best Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and selected by The New York Times Book Review as one of the ten best books of 2011, Thinking, Fast and Slow is destined to be a classic.

Inspiration: Who Are The Entrepreneurs? [INFOGRAPHIC]

whoareentrepreneurs

Required Reading for Entrepreneurs: The Long Tail by Chris Anderson

longtailWhat happens when the bottlenecks that stand between supply and demand in our culture go away and everything becomes available to everyone?“The Long Tail” is a powerful new force in our economy: the rise of the niche. As the cost of reaching consumers drops dramatically, our markets are shifting from a one-size-fits-all model of mass appeal to one of unlimited variety for unique tastes. From supermarket shelves to advertising agencies, the ability to offer vast choice is changing everything, and causing us to rethink where our markets lie and how to get to them. Unlimited selection is revealing truths about what consumers want and how they want to get it, from DVDs at Netflix to songs on iTunes to advertising on Google.

However, this is not just a virtue of online marketplaces; it is an example of an entirely new economic model for business, one that is just beginning to show its power. After a century of obsessing over the few products at the head of the demand curve, the new economics of distribution allow us to turn our focus to the many more products in the tail, which collectively can create a new market as big as the one we already know.

The Long Tail is really about the economics of abundance. New efficiencies in distribution, manufacturing, and marketing are essentially resetting the definition of what’s commercially viable across the board. If the 20th century was about hits, the 21st will be equally about niches.

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